Bathgate in old picture postcards

Bathgate in old picture postcards

Author
:   William F. Hendrie
Municipality
:   Bathgate
Province
:   Lothian, West
Country
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-3167-4
Pages
:   160
Price
:   EUR 16.95 Including VAT *

Delivery time: 2 - 3 working days ((subject too). The illustrated cover may differ.

   


Fragments from the book 'Bathgate in old picture postcards'

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49. Crowds turned out in force to see the unusual sight of a lifeboat in the streets of Bathgate. This horse-drawn lifeboat sailing down Hopetoun Street and into North Bridge Street was brought to the town to raise funds for the Royal National Life Boat Institution and although Bathgate is entirely landlocked and over ten miles from the shores of the Forth, its townsfolk still give generously every year to support this very worth while voluntary body.

50. Girls push a pram as Iadies enjoy a stroll on a sunny summer day in Cochrane Street. The single storey cottages, typical of Bathgate in Victorian times, were gradually giving way to the two storeyed stone built type of house seen on the corner. The old white washed building on the opposite side of the street was a dairy.

51. Crowds turned out in force in 1923 when subsidence in Bathgate's underground coa1 mine workings caused Hopetoun Street to be cordoned off and local residents to be hurriedly ordered to evacuate their homes. To add further to the excitement the cave-in caused a gas main to fracture and there was the added fear of an explosion as James Car1aw loaded his belongings onto the back of this open lorry. On this occasion the collapse of the old colliery workings caused no further damage and Mr. Car1aw and his neighbours were eventually ab Ie to return to their houses, but fifty years later in the 1970's further subsidence further up the hill resulted in several buildings being demolished and even more recently the town's new public library has been threatened by the sinking of more of these workings which run like a honeycomb below the streets of the town.

52. Samuel's barbers pole juts out into North Bridge Street looking up the hill towards Hopetoun Street. The red and white markings on the pole are a reminder of the days when barbers were barber surgeons and were of ten called upon to perform blood letting, thus the red for the blood and the white for the bandages to stem the flow when it was considered that the patient had been relieved of enough blood to cure them. The gold tip to the pole represented the gold bowl or basin in which the blood was caught and thus completes the traditional sign for the barber. Patients too squeemish to have blood letting performed by having their wrist slashed could choose to have the blood removed by black leeches which were stuck to their fore arms. By the time this picture was taken, however, Bathgate's barbers stuck strictly to shaving and giving short back and sides hair cuts.

53. Taking a break between haireuts and shaves in John Samuel's Barbers Shop, Robert White and James Gardener posed for the photographer. Their hand operated hair clippers, brush and scissors ean be seen on the wall and shelf behind the barber's eh air.

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