Chelmsford in old picture postcards

Chelmsford in old picture postcards

Author
:   Stan Jarvis
Municipality
:  
Province
:   Essex
Country
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-2734-9
Pages
:   112
Price
:   EUR 16.95 Including VAT *

Delivery time: 2-3 weeks (subject too). The illustrated cover may differ.

   


Fragments from the book 'Chelmsford in old picture postcards'

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79. The Crossed Keys Inn, in Moulsham Street, was one of the best known of the scores of inns which lined the streets of Chelmsford in Victorian times, when John Bateman ran it as an hotel with livery and bait stables. lts demolition was a pity; Fred Roe, in his 'Essex Survivals' explains: The Crossed Keys Inn, a fifteenth century building of low elevation and strong construction, was still standing in Moulsham Street in 1915. It was the last of Chelmsford's medieval hostelries, and was a really good specimen of ancient domestic architecture. The Crossed keys has now totally disappeared and a picture theatre ... has arisen in its place.

80. Gray and Sons has been the well-known brewer and owner of public houses since as early as 1827. The alehouses were acquired all through the latter half of the nineteenth century, and the Eagle, seen here, was one of them. Projecting across the view of the Eagle, at the left-hand side of the postcard, is a lantem engraved with the words, 'OId White Hart'. This was the public house which stood on the other side of Baddow Road. Just a step up Moulsham Street hangs the sign of the Windmill and, further on, the Old George - a good example of the proliferation of public houses in Chehnsford, showing its importance as a market and shopping centre. This photograph was taken before 1896, for the Eagle was then rebuilt and the date shown on a plaque in the wall, It is now Loveday's, jewellers,

81. The Drill Yard is not even a memory to Chelmsfordians living today, but it is clearly marked on the map of 1876, with its drill shed, on the left of the picture, running its entire length. It is p

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