Barrhead and Neilston in old picture postcards

Barrhead and Neilston in old picture postcards

Auteur
:   Irene I. Hughson
Gemeente
:  
Provincie
:   Renfrewshire, East
Land
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-3273-2
Pagina's
:   80
Prijs
:   EUR 16.95 Incl BTW *

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Fragmenten uit het boek 'Barrhead and Neilston in old picture postcards'

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19. LEVERNBANKS, NEILSTON

People came to work in the new mills and bleachfields from all over the north and west of Scotland, and from Ireland. There was not room for them in the existing villages, though they were growing fast, and the mill owners had to provide some housing. Levembanks and a neighbouring row called High Banks were built to accommodate workers in the Broadlie Spinning Mill. The Broadlie Mill was established by John Airston. (His house at Nether Kirkton is now a Children's Home.) The old turnpike road, now the A 736, ran past the mill and the Levernbanks houses. High Banks was bebind the mill, and higher up the hill: One or two of the High Banks houses are still there. The mill is now a tannery, and Levernbanks has been demolished.

20. WEST ARTHURLIE VILLAGE

West Arthurlie Cotton Spinning Mill was built by a consortium of local business men already involved in cotton bleaching in the parish, Patriek Adair, John Cochrane, John Airston; and the brothers Henry and James Dunlop, who had bought the earliest mill in the area, the Dovecothall Mill. The Countess of Glasgow leased the lands of West Arthurlie to the consortium in 1791. The mil! was equipped with the most advanced machinery. Included in the building plan were rows of werkers' houses. As each block was intended to house four families, West Arthurlie would have been a densely populated industrial village - a self contained community probably with its own shop which would very likely belong to the mil! owners. The farm in the background is Woodneuk.

21. GROUP OF PEOPLE AT SHILFORD

With the increased movement of goods and people that industrialisation gave rise to, better and easier communication routes became necessary. The first big improvement was the opening of the properly constructed Paisley to lrvine Turnpike road in 1820. Travel on it was much quicker and less hazardous than on the old coach roads which were rutted and frequently muddy. The drawback was that you had to pay to use the turnpike road. There were toll barriers at intervals along it. One of these was at Shilford. An interesting detail on this photo is the use ofthe name Arthurlie on James Brownlie's van. Arthurlie was what the area was known as before the rather ugly name of Barrhead was adopted to designate the urban complex that had been formed by the growth and amalgamation of the small villages.

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22. KIRKTON TOLL, LOOKING TOWARDS NEILSTON

Another toll was situated on the Kingston Road. Travellers would have to pay the toll charge to the toll keeper who lived in the house at the side of the wad. He would then open the barrier by turning it through an angle of 90°, so that it lay parallel to the road instead of across it. The toll-keeper, or someone in his family, was expected to be on eall 24 hours a day. Night-time travellers had to rouse the keeper from his bed to let them past.

23. BARRHEAD MAIN STREET, AROUND 1870

The big increase in population in the area led to many administrative changes. One of these was the division of Neilston Parish to take account of the development of Barrhead. In 1842 a new parish of Barrhead was formed with its own parish church, built on a smal! 'bourock' or 'hillock', It is the steeple of the Bourock Kirk that can be seen in the background of this postcard.

24. ALLAN'S CORNER, BARRHEAD

The same building that was shown on the left of the previous picture can be seen here at a later date. It is the Arthurlie Inn which is still flourishing. Next to it is the shop that gave the corner its name. The shop was demolished early this century, but the name stuck and is still in use.

25. ARTHURLIE INN AND THE CONSTITUTIONAL CLUB

Allan's shop was demolished so that the road could be widened to allow for the laying of tram lines, There was a tram service to Glasgow from Barrhead, and a very cheap and popular form of transport it was too. Families could have an interesting day out travelling by tram to the terminus at the other side of Glasgow and back all for the sum of 4d. The Constitutional Club will be more familiar now as the Salvation Army Citadel. But the Salvation Army has just fmished a new, less formidable building in Main Street, and the Citadel was demolished in September 1985.

26. BARRHEAD STATION

The Glasgow to Barrhead Railway was opened in 1848, and was the occasion of much feasting and celebration by the mill owners and businessmen of Barrhead. By 1855 the line had been extended to Crofthead. The station there was known as 'Neilston Low', The line was continued to Kilmarnock in 1873. Railway mania hit Barrhead hard. It was an up and coming place at the time. There was a whole network of rival rail links criss-crossing the town with loops and spur lines to important works. Many of them lasted for a short time only, and clearing them away has proved expensive. The Glasgow to Kilmarnock line is the only one that is still operational. It no longer has a station at Neilston.

Kelburn Street, Barrhead

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27. THE VIADUer, KELBURN STREET, BARRHEAD

The viaduct was one of two, both magnificent pieces of engineering, built by the Paisley and District Railway Company. Work on the line which linked Paisley, Barrhead and Neilston was completed in 1899. There was a station in the centre of Barrhead at Mill Street. The section of the line containing the two viaducts (the other is near Springhill) connected with the Glasgow to Ardrossan line which ran through Neilston. It was regarded by Board of Trade Officials as unsuitable for passenger traffic and only goods trains ran on it. The Springhili Viaduct is still complete though it na langer has a function. Fragments of the Kelburn Street viaduct ean still be seen, but most of it has been bull-dozed recently to make way for a supermarket. The preparation of the site also necessitated the draining of Blackwoo d's dam, the water in the foreground of the photo.

cJtign Street from a.a. Station, J'reifsfon

28. VIEW FROM NEILSTON HIGH STATION

Neilston too had its rail links, and an important part they played in the village's prosperity, This view was taken at the entrance to the station on the Glasgow to Ardrossan line eompleted in 1901 by the Caledonian Railway Company. The line was original!y envisaged as a coal-carrying fine, but the demand for passenger trains was so great, partieularly during the Glasgow Fair when mil! workers were keen to get away from the city to the seaside, that it was opened up for passenger traffie. The line now terminates at Neilston, and is threatened with closure.

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