Bridging the Mersey - a pictorial history

Bridging the Mersey - a pictorial history

Auteur
:   Dave Thompson
Gemeente
:  
Provincie
:   Cheshire
Land
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-2640-3
Pagina's
:   80
Prijs
:   EUR 16.95 Incl BTW *

Levertijd: 2-3 weken (onder voorbehoud). Het getoonde omslag kan afwijken.

   


Fragmenten uit het boek 'Bridging the Mersey - a pictorial history'

<<  |  <  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  >  |  >>

69 The famous Mersey bridges are one of the best known landmarks in the north-west and have featured in many souvenirs such as these commemarative stamps by Halton Localpost UK. This independent postal service was first established in 1986 and has used the images of the bridges in many special souvenir stamps. Those pictured here were produced for Age Concern and to celebrate the 1987 Halton Show: They can be used in place of stamps produced by the royal mail and have taken the image of the Mersey crossings through letter boxes all over the world.

(1.00 LOCA L POST

70 A jubilant handshake between William Rodgers M.P, Secretary of State for Transport, and Councillor George Ford at the opening of the bridge widening scheme in October 1977. The s: 1 2 million irnprovements included the conversion of the bridge to accommodate two additional lanes of traffic, construction of a new cantilevered walkway and several kilometres of dual carriageway on the approaches to the bridge. The work had taken over two years and during that time the bridge was only completely closed for one day. During the widening programme it was announced that the bridge

would be renamed the 'Silver Jubilee Bridge', to commemorate the completion of the works during the Queen's silver jubilee.

71 Children crossing te Widnes on the cantilevered walkway ofthe Silver Jubilee Bridge.

72 Despite its widening in 1977 traffic congestion continued to be a major souree of anxiety for motorists.Today 80,000 ve-

hicles a day cross the bridge, making it during rush hour one of the most renowned bottlenecks in the north-west. Experts

predict that by 2025 this figure will have increased to 125,000 vehicles a day. This has led to fresh claims for a new, second road

crossing over the River Mersey between Runcorn and Widnes. (Photo: Weekly News.)

73 The upkeep and maintenance ofthe Silver Jubilee Bridge casts f, 1 million a year and includes regular painting, resurfacing and concrete repairs to bridge supports. In this picture from the early 1980's we see the bridge being closed for repair work.

74 The lights which illuminate the Silver Jubilee Bridge were flrst switched on to coincide with the BBC's 'Children in Need' celebrations in November 1994. They comprise 164 lamps fitted on purposemade brackets attached to the bridge parapets. The bridge is one of the largest illuminated structures in Britain.

75 The Silver Jubilee Bridge is the scene of one of the most astanishing migrations ofbirds anywhere in the country: During the winter months it is estimated that up to one million starlings settle on the bridge to roost. Over the years many different methods have been used to discourage the feathered fiends, including the use of amplified distress calls, pyrotechnies, strobe lighting and loud explosives. Other suggestions considered have included applying non-setting gel on the ledges used by the birds, spikes attached to

the steelwerk. plastic

hawks and twine, which

produces a humming sound in the wind. Despite the costly array of gadgets and proposals nothing has prevented the nightly scene of birds on the bridge. (Photo: Weekly News.)

-A' ? __ ,,- ?..?. '"'

., . -" .. '

??... : .; - ,«:">", ,... ..

- ????? oo

> >

,.'

76 InApril2000 hundreds of people made history by becoming the first to run over the Silver Jubilee Bridge. The Halton

Road Race 2000 was organized by Halton Borough Council as part of their Millennium celebrations. It was the first time in the

40-year history of the bridge that it had been given over to pedestrian use. Race Director Jim Ross told the Runcorn World:

"The runners were made up the bridge had been given over to them and not the starlings.'

<<  |  <  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  >  |  >>

Sitemap | Links | Colofon | Privacy | Disclaimer | Algemene voorwaarden | Algemene verkoopvoorwaarden | © 2009 - 2021 Uitgeverij Europese Bibliotheek