Brighton in old picture postcards

Brighton in old picture postcards

Auteur
:   John Montgomery
Gemeente
:   Brighton
Provincie
:   Sussex, East
Land
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-2725-7
Pagina's
:   144
Prijs
:   EUR 16.95 Incl BTW *

Levertijd: 2-3 weken (onder voorbehoud). Het getoonde omslag kan afwijken.

   


Fragmenten uit het boek 'Brighton in old picture postcards'

<<  |  <  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  >  |  >>

69. This was the terminus of Volk's e1ectric railway, opposite the Aquarium building, as it looked in about 1906. Cars for Black Rock left every six minutes during the summer. The return fare to visit what were rather ambitiously called 'the white cliffs of Old England' was then fourpence. Tea at Mr. Raglan's tea rooms under the station cast 2d., and a meal was from 5d. to 7d. The roadway of the lower Madeira Drive, seen in our card, had been coated with tar a year earlier, to enable motors to move fast without gathering dust. An early, tall, open automobile may be seen on the left of the picture.

70. In November 1896, Magnus Volk opened his 'Daddy Long-Legs' railway, a multi-wheeled luxury saloon car driven by electricity that ran between Paston Place, Kemp Town, and Rottingdean. It moved on a wide track set in concrete slabs on the chalk, sand, and rock seabed and was a strange mixture of tramcar, yacht, and seaside pier. The Pioneer, as it was named, was wrecked in a storm soon after its first journey, but Mr. Volk quickly repaired it, and later the Prince of Wales took two pleasure trips on it. Unfortunately the car on stilts, which at high tide needed to plough through the waves, frequently broke down. In 1900 the line closed, partly because the Corporation decided to build concrete groynes into the sea, to save the cliffs. The only relic of the Seashore Electric Tramroad, as it was called, is the long line of concrete blocks that once carried rails, which are still to be seen at low tide along the shore.

310

THE RECENT LANOSLIP AT BLACK ROCK. BRIGHTON. 8HOwtHG TERtWW8 Ol' V()U('S ELECTRtO RAa.."Y

71. A landslip on the white chalk cliffs at Black Rock, Kemp Town, shows the area as it was in 1910, long before the present undercliff walk was built. The constant crumbling away of the chalk had left the Abergavenny Arms inn and a dairy and shop in a precarious position. The eastern terminus of Volk's railway may be seen near the sea, and the Palace Pier is dimly visible beyond the lamp posts. Today, the houses have gone, and the beach on the left has been completely taken over by the giant concrete Marina yachting harbour, which was built in the 1960's a

<<  |  <  |  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  >  |  >>

Sitemap | Links | Colofon | Privacy | Disclaimer | Leveringsvoorwaarden | © 2009 - 2019 Uitgeverij Europese Bibliotheek