Ockbrook in old picture postcards

Ockbrook in old picture postcards

Auteur
:   J.Lec. Smith
Gemeente
:  
Provincie
:   Derbyshire
Land
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-2983-1
Pagina's
:   80
Prijs
:   EUR 16.95 Incl BTW *

Levertijd: 2 - 3 werkdagen (onder voorbehoud). Het getoonde omslag kan afwijken.

   


Fragmenten uit het boek 'Ockbrook in old picture postcards'

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69. This wedding took place in Ockbrook in 1898, when large flowery hats were obviously à la mode. It is not known at which church the ceremony was held, but at one time it was not uncommon for Moravians and other non-conforrnists to be married at All Saints, the happy couple feeling perhaps that such was necessary to get the official seal of the Establishment on their contract. The brîdegroom, whose name was Cranham, was one of the best local cricketers of his time and had trials with Derbyshire. Early photographers seemed to demand approprîate studled poses to match the occasion, thus the groom looks suitably masterful, the bride suitably submissive, the bridesmaîds suitably supportive, and the child suitably squashed. Even the dog seems to know his place.

70. The first part of the Church Street School was built in 1829, for girls. lts construction was financed by Thomas Pares and it was pJaced in the front left-hand corner of a strip of land he owned which lay between Glovers Twitchell and the forge. In 1840 it was enJarged to its present size to become a mixed school and then in 1848 an additional building was provided for the infants in Flood Street. About this time the vicar of the day, the Reverend Samuel Hey, became concerned about the education of the increasing number of chiIdren living at Borrowash, and he had a school built for them on the Derby Road entirely at his own expense. These schools were known as 'National' or 'Church' schools, which were abbreviations of their proper designation, which was 'National Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor in the Principles of the Established Church' school.

71. The gentleman in the class photograph is a mystery. Could it be our friend the Reverend Lewis Lewis, suitably bowed by his years and distaff control? The headrnistress, the beloved Miss Harriet Nadin, will be oneof the two ladies on the right. She chose to continue to live in her father's forge cottage next door to the school rather than take up the official headteachers' residence in the church-owned School House across the street. There an upstage mid-wife, Miss Eliza Sells, held sway. She only 'did' for the local gentr

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