Tewkesbury in old picture postcards volume 1

Tewkesbury in old picture postcards volume 1

Auteur
:   Charles Hilton
Gemeente
:  
Provincie
:   Gloucestershire
Land
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-2133-0
Pagina's
:   80
Prijs
:   EUR 16.95 Incl BTW *

Levertijd: 2-3 weken (onder voorbehoud). Het getoonde omslag kan afwijken.

   


Fragmenten uit het boek 'Tewkesbury in old picture postcards volume 1'

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- Atthe Hop I'ole at I ewkesbury. they stopped to dme ; lpen which occasion there was more bonled ale. wirh some nore Madeira, and some Port besid s: and here the case>oule was replenisbed for the fourth time. Under tbe nlluenee of these combiried stimulants. :lr. Piekwiek and k Ben Allen feil {ast asl ep or thirty mi Ie . while Bob and 1r. V eller san~ duets In tbe hckev."

rhe Piekwiek Papers. Chao, L (Charles Diekens.)

69. The Hop Pole's conneetion with Charles Dickens is evident from the words on the postcard, printed in the 1920s. On the occasion of the novelist's birthday, members of the local Dickensian Society used to hang a wreath over the plaque by the door. By the mid-twenties the motor car was weil on the way to superseding the horse for getting about. Production of civilian cars stopped in 1915, but resumed in late 1918. Two out of every five cars were Fords. William Morris entered the field against tremendous odds, and produced the famous bull-nosed model parked in front of the hotel. lts radiator was changed to a rectangular shape in 1927. Interest in cars was extremely high as new models appeared with striking regularity. The Hop Pole was as popular a place in which to wine and dine in the 1920s and 1930s as it had been in the old coaching days, a reputation which it enjoys today.

70. Alleys and Courts are characteristic of Tewkesbury, and are of historie and architectural significanee. They evolved from the paths which separated the butgages held by the burgesses of the town throughout Medieval and Tudor times. At one time there were one hundred and forty-six paths and their accompanying buildings, but this number dwindled to under fifty during the 19th century and early 20th century. Today there are twelve open alleys, and about thirty-two Courts with access to private dwellings or businesses, Lilley's Alley is opposite the Hop Pole Hotel. Although some of it was pulled down in the present century, the part that is Ie ft is attractive. It leads past the timber-framed cottage, seen here as it was in 1911, with the water-trough and pump serving all the cottages of the alley. The cottage has a pronounced overhang, and further on is a fme Medieval barn with end-crucks and two bays with queen-post trusses,

71. Round the corner of the Crescent, and almost in the shadow of the Abbey, stand Richardson's Almshouses. The buildings here are as they were in 1930, but they were pulled down in 1966 to make way for up-tc-date dwellings. These old almshouses were founded by Mr. Edward Richardson, By his will of 1651 he bequeathed f60 to the Corporation of Tewkesbury to be laid out for the benefit of the poor. Seven houses and six gardens in Gander Lane were purchased, and poor people, recommended through the Corporation, were placed in them. In 1885 the finanees of two other groups of almshouses were ama!gamated with Richardson's. Between them they housed eight married

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