Up Holland in old picture postcards volume 2

Up Holland in old picture postcards volume 2

Auteur
:   Dr. Allan Miller
Gemeente
:  
Provincie
:   Lancashire
Land
:   United Kingdom
ISBN13
:   978-90-288-0954-3
Pagina's
:   80
Prijs
:   EUR 16.95 Incl BTW *

Levertijd: 2-3 weken (onder voorbehoud). Het getoonde omslag kan afwijken.

   


Fragmenten uit het boek 'Up Holland in old picture postcards volume 2'

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69 Great efforts were made on behalf of the church schools in Up Holland, but academic progress was retarded by a number of factors. Same parents neglected to send their children to school. Sickness and severe weather affected attendance and children often missed school at harvest, potato picking or blackberry seasons. Mondays were traditionally bad for attendance because 'many of the children go to Wigan'. However, the report by the Government Inspectors on the village schools in 1 930 indicated that these difficulties were being overcome: 'Conveyance to a stranger of what has been learnt, ease and happiness in the exchange of ideas and ideals, these have been actually the main difficulty to be surmounted by children in country schools, and it is excellent that it is precisely in these aspects that a visitor notices happy progress.'

70 In 1907, Lancashire Education Committee felt that it was 'inadvisable' far the Up Holland Grammar School to continue to exist as a secondary school, but local inhabitants raised a petition stating that the school was 'very necessary' in the interests of those who desired secondary education in the neighbourhood. Since 1902 it had shared with other schools in Up Holland in providing technical instruction at evening classes in hygiene, ambulance, nursing, needlework, dressmaking. millinery, cookery, shorthand. English. maternities. chemistry, mining, magnetism and electricity. But technical! education was not cheap. In 1918 an evening typewriting class with 38 students had only one machine; the teacher was refused more typewriters because of the excessive casts' and was instructed to confine the class to shorthand.

7 1 During the First World War Saint Joseph's College was virtually at a standstill as many students joined the farces. With peace, College life returned to normal and there was an inf1ux of bath Senior and Junior students. Ta accommodate the increased numbers of students and to enable them to have complete uninterrupted training it was considered necessary to enlarge the College. The inspiration for the extension came from Archbishop Francis Keating. Between 1923 and 1930 there was almost continuous development and expansion of the College, including the North Wing, the new East Wing, the South Wing and the new Chapel, planned by Purcell. The extensions were built in red sandstone, brought in from Prescot, Rainhill and Woolton, which contrasts with the darker local stone of the original building.

72 The initial plan was to have one lake i

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